strike verb Definition in the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary

Definition of “strike” - Learner’s Dictionary


/straɪk/ ( past tense and past participle struck)
HIT [T] B1 to hit someone or something: Two climbers were struck by falling rocks. His car went out of control and struck a tree. I've never heard of anyone being struck by lightning.Physical and sexual assault and abductionSexual activity in generalHitting and beatingPunishing by causing pain
THINK [T] B2 If a thought or idea strikes you, you suddenly think of it: [+ (that)] It struck me that I'd forgotten to order the champagne.Inspiration and inspiring
strike sb as sth If someone strikes you as having a particular quality, they seem to have that quality: He didn't strike me as a passionate man.Seeming and purporting to beFaking and pretending
NOT WORK [I] B2 to stop working for a period of time because you want more money, etc: Bus drivers are threatening to strike.Industrial relations
EFFECT [T] If something bad strikes something or someone, it affects them strongly and quickly: The hurricane struck the coast at about eight in the morning.Affecting and influencing
ATTACK [I] to attack suddenly: The marines will strike at dawn.Attacking and invading
CLOCK [I, T] If a clock strikes, a bell rings to show what the time is.Watches and clocks
strike gold, oil, etc to find a supply of gold, oil, etc in the groundMineralogyMining and quarryingFinding and discovering
strike a match to light a match in order to produce fireStarting fires
strike a balance to give two things the same amount of attention: It's important to strike a balance between spending and saving.Balance and imbalance
strike a deal If two people strike a deal, they promise to do something for each other that will give them both an advantage: The book's author has struck a deal with a major film company. →  See also strike a chord (with sb) , be struck dumb Making and breaking promises and commitments
(Definition of strike verb from the Cambridge Learners Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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