taste noun Definition in the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Definition of “taste” - Learner’s Dictionary

taste

noun     /teɪst/
FOOD [C, U] B1 the flavour of a particular food in your mouth: a sweet/bitter taste It's got quite a strong taste.Flavours and tastes
ABILITY [U] B2 the ability to feel different flavours in your mouth: When you've got a cold you often lose your sense of taste.Flavours and tastesThe senses in general
a taste a small amount of food that you have in order to try it: Could I have just a taste of the sauce?Food - general wordsWords meaning small pieces and amounts
WHAT YOU LIKE [C, U] B2 the particular things you like, such as styles of music, clothes, decoration, etc: I don't like his taste in music. It's okay, but it's not really to my taste.Liking
ART/STYLE ETC [U] the ability to judge what is attractive or suitable, especially in things related to art, style, beauty, etc: Everything in his house is beautiful - he's got very good taste.Analysing and evaluatingAssessing and estimating value
be in good taste to be acceptable in a way that will not upset or anger peoplePolite and respectfulPolite and respectful
be in bad/poor taste to be unacceptable in a way that will upset or anger people: He told a joke about a plane crash which I thought was in rather poor taste.Serious and unpleasantNot attractive to look atInformal words for badRude and cheekyRelating to sex and sexual desire
a taste for sth when you like or enjoy something: I've developed a bit of a taste for opera. Over the years I've lost my taste for travel.Liking
taste of sth B2 a short experience of something new: That was my first taste of Mexican culture.Testing, checking and experimenting
(Definition of taste noun from the Cambridge Learners Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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