way noun Definition in the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary
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Definition of “way” - Learner’s Dictionary

way

noun
 
 
/weɪ/
METHOD [C] A2 how you do something: [+ to do sth] I must find a way to help him. [+ of + doing sth] We looked at various ways of solving the problem. [+ (that)] It was the way that she told me that I didn't like.Ways of achieving things
ROUTE [C] A2 the route you take to get from one place to another: [usually singular] Is there another way out of here? I must buy a paper on the way home. Can you find your way back to my house? I took the wrong road and lost my way (= got lost).Routes and roads in general
make your way to/through/towards, etc B2 to move somewhere, often with difficulty: We made our way through the shop to the main entrance.Advancing and moving forward
be on her/my/its, etc way to be arriving soon: Apparently she's on her way.Journeys
in/out of the/sb's way B2 in/not in the area in front of someone that they need to pass or see through: I couldn't see because Bill was in the way. Sorry, am I in your way? Could you move out of the way, please?Space - general wordsAreas of land in general
a third of the way/most of the way, etc used to say how much of something is completed: A third of the way through the film she dies.Complete and wholeVery and extreme
get in the way of sth/sb to prevent someone from doing or continuing with something: Don't let your new friends get in the way of your studies.Preventing and impedingLimiting and restricting
be under way to be already happening: Building work is already under way.Making progress and advancingBecoming better
give way (to sb/sth) to allow someone to get what they want, or to allow something to happen after trying to prevent it: The boss finally gave way when they threatened to stop work.Allowing and permitting UK ( US yield) to allow other vehicles to go past before you move onto a roadDriving and operating road vehicles
give way to sth to change into something else: Her excitement quickly gave way to horror.ChangingAdapting and modifying Adapting and attuning to somethingChanging frequently
give way If something gives way, it falls because it is not strong enough to support the weight on top of it: Suddenly the ground gave way under me.Tearing and breaking into piecesFalling and droppingMoving downwards
get sth out of the way to finish something: I'll go shopping when I've got this essay out of the way.Coming to an endCausing something to end
DIRECTION [C] B1 a direction something faces or travels: This bus is going the wrong way. Which way up does this picture go (= which side should be at the top)? UK He always wears his baseball cap the wrong way round (= backwards).Direction of motionPoints of the compass
SPACE/TIME [no plural] B1 an amount of space or time: We're a long way from home. The exams are still a long way away/off.Space - general wordsAreas of land in generalPeriods of time - general words
make way to move away so that someone or something can passGeneral words for movement
make way for sth If you move or get rid of something to make way for something new, you do so in order to make a space for the new thing: They knocked down the old houses to make way for a new hotel.Space - general wordsAreas of land in general
in a way/in many ways B2 used to say that you think something is partly true: In a way his behaviour is understandable.Incomplete
in no way not at all: This is in no way your fault.Yes, no and not
there's no way informal B1 If there is no way that something will happen, it is certainly not allowed or not possible: There's no way that dog's coming in the house.Yes, no and notUnachievableImpossible and improbable
No way! informal B1 certainly not: "Would you invite him to a party?" "No way!"Yes, no and not
get/have your (own) way to get what you want, although it might upset other people: She always gets her own way in the end.SelfishnessInconsiderate
in a big/small way informal used to describe how much or little you do a particular thing: They celebrate birthdays in a big way.Ways of achieving things
a/sb's way of life B1 the way someone lives: Violence has become a way of life there.Lifestyles and their study
→  See also the Milky Way , by the way , go out of your way to do sth , rub sb up the wrong way
(Definition of way noun from the Cambridge Learners Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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