freeze verb translation to Turkish: Cambridge Dictionary

Translation of "freeze" - English-Turkish dictionary


/friːz/ ( past tense froze, past participle frozen)
ICE [I, T] B1 If something freezes or is frozen, it becomes hard and solid because it is very cold.
donmak, buzlanmak, buz tutmak, dondurmak
The river had frozen overnight. Water freezes at 0° Celsius.IceColdSnow and ice
FOOD [I, T] B1 to make food last a long time by making it very cold and hard
(gıda) dondurmak, dondurarak saklamak
You can freeze any cakes that you have left over.Preserving and storing food
PERSON [I] B2 to feel very cold
buz tutmak, çok donmak, buz kesmek
One of the climbers froze to death on the mountain.ColdSnow and ice
NOT MOVE [I] B2 to suddenly stop moving, especially because you are frightened
dona kalmak, korkudan buz kesmek
She saw someone outside the window and froze.Immobility
LEVEL [T] to fix the level of something such as a price or rate so that it does not increase
(fiyat, oran) dondurmak, sabitlemek
Value and price decreases
(Definition of freeze verb from the Cambridge Learners Dictionary English-Turkish © Cambridge University Press)
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