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The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Double-click dictionary search

Double-click dictionary search

Did you know that you can get an instant definition of any word on this page, just by double-clicking on it?

Try it now! Double-click on any of the following words to see the definition: a, opt, psychology, stop, walk.

You can also look up phrases, such as a bite to eat. Just use your mouse to highlight the phrase and click on the word Definition when it appears.

You can add this functionality to your site as well &mash; follow the instructions:

  1. Make sure your site uses the latest version of jQuery. If you are not using jQuery, you can download it from jquery.com. You will then need to call the jQuery javascript file from the head of your HTML pages.
    <script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="jquery.js"></script>
  2. Download the dblclick.js file, and add it to your site. Again, you will need to call the javascript file from the head of your HTML pages.
    <script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="dblclick.js"></script>
  3. Finally, call the setupDoubleClick function by adding an onload attribute to your HTML body element.
    <body onload=" setupDoubleClick( 'http://dictionary.cambridge.org/', 'british', false, null, 5, 'popup' ) ">

Please note that while we try to ensure this is compatible with commonly used desktop browsers including Internet Explorer 6-9, Firefox, Chrome, and Safari 4, users of touchscreen devices which do not have a mouse and do not ‘click’ will unfortunately not be able to take advantage of this, so you may also want to consider adding a search widget to your site.

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Word of the Day

past participle

the form of a verb, usually made by adding -ed, used in some grammatical structures such as the passive and the present perfect

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Euphemisms (Words used to Avoid Offending People)

by Kate Woodford,
March 04, 2015
​​​ We recently looked at the language that we use to describe lies and lying. One area of lying that we considered was ‘being slightly dishonest, or not speaking the complete truth’. One reason for not speaking the complete truth is to avoid saying something that might upset or offend people. Words and

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