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Each or every?

We use each to refer to individual things in a group or a list of two or more things. It is often similar in meaning to every, but we use every to refer to a group or list of three or more things.

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Each one takes turns cooking dinner in the evenings.

Each stresses individual members of a group.

Each refers to two or more people who share the work.

Everyone takes turns cooking dinner in the evenings.

Every stresses all the members of the complete group.

Every refers to three or more people.

We use adverbs such as almost, practically and nearly with every, but not with each:

Almost every car in the car park was new.

Not: Almost each car

Practically every house now has at least two televisions.

Not: Practically each house

We can use each of + pronoun or each of + determiner + noun, but with every we must use every one + pronoun or every one + determiner + noun:

Each of us has a bicycle.

Every one of us has a bicycle.

Not: Every of us

Each of the children received a special gift.

Every one of the children received a special gift.

Not: Every of the children

(“Each or every ?” from English Grammar Today © Cambridge University Press. Need grammar practice? Try English Grammar Today with Workbook.)

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