Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

There is no future tense in English. We use several different ways to talk about the future. The most common are:

They’re going to build a new shopping centre here. (be going to)

Leena is working in Singapore next week. (present continuous)

I think they will postpone the match. (modal verb will)

Nadia arrives in about half-an-hour from now. (present simple)

I’ll be running ten kilometres a day for the next two weeks to get ready for the marathon. (future continuous)

We’re late. Do you think the lecture will have started? (future perfect)

We’re just about to leave for the cinema. (be about to)

The president is to visit Brazil in November. (be to)

The visitors are due to arrive at the factory early in the morning. (be due to)

I was on the point of leaving my job but then I got promoted so I changed my mind. (be on the point of)

She promised she would return soon. (future in the past)

They said they were having a holiday next April. (future in the past)

(“Future” from English Grammar Today © Cambridge University Press. Need grammar practice? Try English Grammar Today with Workbook.)
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Word of the Day

guru

a religious leader or teacher in the Hindu or Sikh religion

Word of the Day

The way we move (Verbs for walking and running)

by Kate Woodford,
March 25, 2015
​​​ This week we’re looking at interesting ways to describe the way that people move. Most of the verbs that we’ll be considering describe how fast or slow people move. Others describe the attitude or state of mind of the person walking or running. Some describe both. Starting with verbs for walking slowly,

Read More 

crossfit noun

March 23, 2015
high-intensity strength training Two women in strappy dresses discussed how much weight they could snatch

Read More