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There is no future tense in English. We use several different ways to talk about the future. The most common are:

They’re going to build a new shopping centre here. (be going to)

Leena is working in Singapore next week. (present continuous)

I think they will postpone the match. (modal verb will)

Nadia arrives in about half-an-hour from now. (present simple)

I’ll be running ten kilometres a day for the next two weeks to get ready for the marathon. (future continuous)

We’re late. Do you think the lecture will have started? (future perfect)

We’re just about to leave for the cinema. (be about to)

The president is to visit Brazil in November. (be to)

The visitors are due to arrive at the factory early in the morning. (be due to)

I was on the point of leaving my job but then I got promoted so I changed my mind. (be on the point of)

She promised she would return soon. (future in the past)

They said they were having a holiday next April. (future in the past)

(“Future” from English Grammar Today © Cambridge University Press. Need grammar practice? Try English Grammar Today with Workbook.)
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