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Have got and have

from English Grammar Today

Have got and have mean the same. Have got is more informal. We use have (got) here to refer to both verbs:

I’ve got a terrible pain in my back.

I have a terrible pain in my back. (more formal)

They haven’t got a car.

They don’t have a car. (more formal)

We use have (got) to talk about possession, relationships, characteristics and illnesses. In these contexts, it is not used in the continuous form:

She’s got two cats and a dog.

She has two cats and a dog.

Not: She is having got two cats and a dog.

Have you got a drill?

Do you have a drill? (more formal)

How many brothers have you got?

How many brothers do you have? (more formal)

She’s got a new boyfriend.

She has a new boyfriend. (more formal)

She’s got a delightful voice.

She has a delightful voice. (more formal)

It’s got 153 calories and 45g of carbohydrates.

It has 153 calories and 45g of carbohydrates. (more formal)

I have never had the measles.

She’s got a headache.

Not: She is having a headache.

(“Have got and have” from English Grammar Today © Cambridge University Press. Need grammar practice? Try English Grammar Today with Workbook.)
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