after preposition, adverb, conjunction definition, meaning - what is after preposition, adverb, conjunction in the British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “after”

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after

preposition uk   /ˈɑːf.tər/  us   /ˈæf.tɚ/
A1 following in time, place, or order: Let's go for a walk after breakfast. Some people believe in life after death. Her name came after mine on the list. There's a good film on the day after tomorrow. She waited until well after midnight.US It's a quarter after four. She just keeps on working, day after day, week after week (= continuously). We've had meeting after meeting (= many meetings) to discuss this point. Jessie seemed very small after (= in comparison with) Michael's children. After (= despite) everything I've done for you, is this the way you treat me? After (= because of) what she did to me, I'll never trust her again. The children have to learn to tidy up after themselves (= after they have made things untidy). She slammed the door after (= behind) her. We ran after (= followed) him, but he escaped. Could you lock up after you (= when you leave), please?be after sb/sth informal to be looking for someone or something or trying to find or get him, her, or it: The police are after him. I'm after a tie to go with this shirt. I'm sure she's after my husband. He's after Jane's job (= wants it for himself).after you used to say politely that someone can go in front of you or serve themselves with food before you: "Can I pour you some coffee?" "Oh no, after you." typical of or similar to the style of: a painting after Titian a concerto after MozartC2 used when giving someone or something the same name as another person or thing: He was named Mark after his grandfather.
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after

adverb uk   /ˈɑːf.tər/  us   /ˈæf.tɚ/
A2 later than someone or something else: Hilary got here at midday and Nick arrived soon after. I can't go next week - how about the week after (= the following week)?not standard She got back at 4.30 and went to see Emilie after (= after she got back).
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after

(Definition of after preposition, adverb, conjunction from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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