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English definition of “consolidate”

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consolidate

verb [I or T] uk   /kənˈsɒl.ɪ.deɪt/ us    /-ˈsɑː.lɪ-/
to become, or cause something to become, stronger, and more certain: The success of their major product consolidated the firm's position in the market. She hoped that marriage would consolidate their relationship. The party consolidated its hold on power during its term of office. The company has been expanding rapidly and I feel it's now time to consolidate (= stop growing and make our present position stronger). to combine several things, especially businesses, so that they become more effective, or to be combined in this way: The two firms consolidated to form a single company.
consolidated
adjective uk   /-deɪ.tɪd/ us    /-deɪ.t̬ɪd/
consolidated trading/accounts
consolidation
noun [C or U] uk   /kənˌsɒl.ɪˈdeɪ.ʃən/ us    /-ˌsɑː.lɪ-/
The company is entering a period of consolidation (= becoming better and stronger at what it does). We have seen a similar consolidation (= joining together) of booksellers and distributors.
(Definition of consolidate from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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