degree noun Meaning in Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of "degree" - English Dictionary

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degreenoun

uk   us   /dɪˈɡriː/

degree noun (AMOUNT)

B2 [C usually singular, U] (an) amount or level of something: This job demands a high degree of skill. There isn't the slightest degree of doubt that he's innocent. I have to warn you that there's a degree of (= some) danger involved in this. The number of terrorist attacks has increased to a terrifying degree. There was some degree of truth in what she said. To what degree do you think we will be providing a better service? "That's really bad." "Well, it's all a matter/question of degree (= there are other things better and other things worse)."
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degree noun (UNIT)

A2 [C] (written abbreviation deg.) any of various units of measurement, especially of temperature or angles, usually shown by the symbol ° written after a number: a difference of three degrees Water boils at 212° Fahrenheit and 100° Celsius/Centigrade. A right angle is an angle of 90°. New York is on a latitude of 41°N and a longitude of 74°W.
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degree noun (SUBJECT OF STUDY)

B1 [C] a course of study at a college or university, or the qualification given to a student after he or she has completed his or her studies: She has a physics degree/a degree in physics from Edinburgh.mainly US She has a bachelor's/master's degree in history from Yale.UK "What degree did you do at York?" "Geography."
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(Definition of degree noun from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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