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English definition of “neither”

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neither

determiner, pronoun, conjunction, adverb uk   /ˈnaɪ.ðər/ /ˈniː-/ us    /-ðɚ/
B2 not either of two things or people: We've got two TVs, but neither works properly. Neither of my parents likes my boyfriend. Neither one of us is interested in gardening. "Which one would you choose?" "Neither. They're both terrible." If she doesn't agree to the plan, neither will Tom (= he will also not). Chris wasn't at the meeting and neither was her assistant. informal "I don't feel like going out this evening." "Me neither." On two occasions she was accused of stealing money from the company, but in neither case was there any evidence to support the claims.neither ... nor B2 used when you want to say that two or more things are not true: Neither my mother nor my father went to university. They speak neither French nor German, but a strange mixture of the two. I neither know nor care what happened to him.
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Translations of “neither”
in Korean (부정문)-도 마찬가지로 아니다…
in Arabic وَلا…
in French ni l’un ni l’autre, aucun des deux…
in Turkish hiç biri, hiç birisi…
in Italian nemmeno…
in Chinese (Traditional) 兩者皆非,兩者都不…
in Russian тоже не…
in Polish ani, też nie…
in Spanish ninguno de los dos…
in Portuguese nem…
in German kein…
in Catalan tampoc…
in Japanese (否定文、否定節の後で)~も~(し)ない…
in Chinese (Simplified) 两者皆非,两者都不…
(Definition of neither from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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SMART Thesaurus: Either, or, neither, nor

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