spend Meaning, definition in Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of "spend" - English Dictionary

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spendverb

uk   us   /spend/ (spent, spent)

spend verb (MONEY)

A2 [I or T] to give money as a payment for something: How much did you spend? I don't know how I managed to spend so much in the club last night. We spent a fortune when we were in New York. She spends a lot of money on clothes. We've just spent $1.9 million on improving our computer network. We went on a spending spree (= we bought a lot of things) on Saturday.
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spend verb (TIME)

A2 [T] to use time doing something or being somewhere: I think we need to spend more time together. I spent a lot of time cleaning that room. I've spent years building up my collection. I spent an hour at the station waiting for the train. How long do you spend on your homework? My sister always spends ages in the bathroom. We spent the weekend in Buenos Aires. You can spend the night here if you like.
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spend verb (FORCE)

[T] to use energy, effort, force, etc., especially until there is no more left: For the past month he's been spending all his energy trying to find a job. They continued firing until all their ammunition was spent (= there was none of it left). The hurricane will probably have spent most of its force (= most of its force will have gone) by the time it reaches the northern parts of the country. Her anger soon spent itself (= stopped).

spendnoun [S]

uk   us   /spend/ UK informal
the amount of money that is spent on something: The total spend on the project was almost a million pounds.
(Definition of spend from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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