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English definition of “conclusion”

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conclusion

noun
 
 
/kənˈkluːʒən/
[C] a decision or judgment that is made after careful thought: The findings and conclusions of the report are simply guidelines, not rulings.reach/come to/draw a conclusion Information is gathered into a profile and analytical software draws conclusions about the customer's likely interests.come to the conclusion that The new boss soon came to the conclusion that the German company could turn round the ailing British subsidiary.
[S] the end of a meeting, a speech, a performance, etc.: Unions called for a conclusion of the negotiations by the end of the week. The United States trade representative, speaking at the conclusion of the talks on Wednesday, made it clear that the two countries still had significant differences on these issues.
[S or U] the fact of something being arranged or agreed formally: This latest development has removed a major obstacle to the conclusion of the deal.
in conclusion formal said or written when you are ending a speech, report, etc.: I want to re-emphasise in conclusion my commitment to the new climate of partnership in this country. In conclusion, it seems that the increasing incidence of audit committees has not restored confidence in financial reporting.
Translations of “conclusion”
in Korean 결론…
in Arabic استِنتاج…
in Portuguese conclusão…
in Catalan conclusió…
in Japanese 結論…
in Italian conclusione…
in Chinese (Traditional) 結局, 結尾, 結果…
in Russian заключение, вывод, завершение…
in Turkish sonuç, nihai son, son…
in Chinese (Simplified) 结局, 结尾, 结果…
in Polish wniosek, zakończenie…
(Definition of conclusion from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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