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English definition of “executive”

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executive

adjective [before noun]
 
 
/ɪɡˈzekjətɪv/
relating to making decisions and managing businesses or government: executive decision/duty An executive decision was made to move to another site. The organizational pyramid had executive management at the top and supervisors and employees at the bottom.
having or relating to the power to take action on decisions: executive authority/leadership/power Reshaping the culture of the corporation around the needs of the entire enterprise requires executive leadership. The IMF is fully accountable to its membership, through the 24-member executive board. →  Compare non-executive
relating to executives (= important people in a company who make decisions): an executive appointment/job/position executive bonuses/pay/salary They appointed a relocation officer at executive level. The interview board considered that the candidate was definitely executive material.
suitable for people with important jobs in business: an executive jet He had a drink in the airport executive lounge before boarding his flight. He worked in the executive suite at Northwest Airlines.
expensive and of a high quality: an executive car/flat/home
(Definition of executive adjective from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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