foot noun - definition in the Business English Dictionary - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “foot”

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foot

noun
 
 
/fʊt/
[C] ( plural feet, foot) ( written abbreviation ft) MEASURES a unit of measurement equal to 12 inches or 0.3048 metres, sometimes shown by the symbol ′: His brief was to provide 10 million square feet of office space on a 16-acre site.
[S] the bottom or lower end of something: the foot of sth Additional notes are added at the foot of the page.
be run/rushed off your feet to be extremely busy: Business was booming, and everyone in the office was rushed off their feet.
drag your feet to be very slow in doing sth, for example taking a decision: Reformers claim that the FSA is dragging its feet on banking reform.
fall/land on your feet to be successful or lucky, especially after a period of not having success or luck: After the redundancies, about a fifth of the workers immediately landed on their feet, getting jobs at a local start-up company.
get back on your feet ( also get sb/sth back on their feet) to start experiencing an improved situation after a time of trouble or difficulty or to help a person, company, etc. to do this: There is enormous support for quick, low-interest loans to help companies get back on their feet after a disaster.
get a/your foot in the door to enter a business or an organization at a low level, but with a chance of being more successful in the future: Graduate Careers Opportunities will help you get a foot in the door of your chosen career.
get your feet wet to start doing something new: The company got its feet wet by taking a stand at the trader's exhibition.
(Definition of foot noun from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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