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English definition of “force”

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force

noun
 
 
/fɔːs/
[C, usually singular] a person or thing with a lot of influence, power, or energy: a dominant/major/powerful force The takeover will create a powerful new force in Britain's food retail industry.commercial/competitive/economic forces Potent commercial forces are bringing the hydrogen economy along faster than anyone thought possible.a force for change/good The movement of work to developing economies must be a force for good.
[C] a group of people organized and trained for a particular purpose: The company soon had a sales force distributed across Europe.
[U] the influence or authority of something: They made sure the minister felt the full force of business resentment at the government's new workplace laws. It was not until the summer that the advertising campaign gained force. These building codes do not have the force of law. →  See also driving force , labour force , market forces , sales force , task force , workforce
in force if laws, rules, or systems are in force, they are being used: The notice lists the import duties and taxes currently in force.
a force to be reckoned with a powerful person or organization with a lot of influence: The company is fast becoming a force to be reckoned with on the global telecom scene.
combine/join forces to work with someone in order to achieve something you both want: The two companies, one Dutch the other French, have just joined forces to exploit the European market for petfood.
come into/enter into force when laws, rules, or systems come into force, they start being used: The final stage of measures to improve access to work for disabled employees comes into force tomorrow.
(Definition of force noun from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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