knock verb - definition in the Business English Dictionary - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “knock”

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knock

verb [T]
 
 
/nɒk/
to cause a sudden and unexpected change in something such as prices: His downbeat assessment knocked the company's share price enough to ensure that it failed to rejoin the FTSE 100. Analysts have warned that price cuts and slowing sales would knock profits.
to affect someone or something badly: The hotel and conference sector has been knocked sideways by a catalogue of problems in recent years. Manufacturing redundancies in the area are knocking buyers' confidence.be knocked by sth The financial markets were badly knocked by the week's political turmoil.
informal to criticize something or someone: Critics may knock the company, but it's still a good investment. You can knock him for some things, but you have to give him credit for his record.
come knocking informal to visit or talk to someone in order to ask for something: We assist small companies that want to expand their capabilities - if they come knocking, we don't turn them down.
knock on/at sb's door informal to talk to a person or an organization because you want them to help you, or you want to join them: In the two years since it launched its first plan, nearly 218,000 investors have knocked on its door. In 1911, 39 per cent of Britain's working women were domestic servants, now they are knocking at the boardroom door.
knock sth on the head UK informal to prevent something from happening, or to finally finish something: The company knocked housing market concerns on the head with a 32% rise in full-year profits.
knock spots off sth/sb UK informal to be much better than something or someone else: This ingenious colour viewfinder knocks spots off current LCD displays.
knock sth/sb into shape informal to take action to get something or someone into good condition: His arrival on the board has finally knocked the company into shape.
knock the bottom out of sth to damage something severely, especially by destroying its support: The rise in mortgage rates really knocked the bottom out of the housing market.
(Definition of knock verb from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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