labour - definition in the Business English Dictionary - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “labour”

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labour

noun [U] UK ( US labor)
 
 
/ˈleɪbər/
practical work, especially involving physical effort: The cost will depend on the amount of labour involved. They gave us an estimated price including parts and labour. The shorts sell for $45, but the hard labor of the women who made them cost just 50 cents. Most jobs these days aren't exhausting manual labour.
HR workers in a company or a country, especially people who do practical work with their hands: skilled/unskilled labour Foreign workers were brought in to fill a temporary shortfall in skilled labor. We use casual labour during busy periods. cheap/local/temporary labour More companies are building plants abroad to take advantage of cheaper labor costs. labour disputes/shortages/standards
withdraw your labour UK HR to stop working as a way of complaining about or trying to change something, such as pay or working conditions: The pilots have chosen to withdraw their labour at a crucial time in the airline's history.
→  See also agency labour , casual adjective , child labour , direct labour , division of labour , forced labour , indirect labour , organized labour , sweated labour
(Definition of labour from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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