price verb Meaning in Cambridge Business English Dictionary
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Meaning of "price" - Business English Dictionary

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price

verb [T]
 
 
/praɪs/
COMMERCE, MARKETING to decide the price of a particular product or service: price sth at sth With tickets priced at $300 a person, proceeds from the event are to be given to charity. Many stocks are priced as if oil were still $28 to $30 a barrel.price sth high/low The sales team felt that the new product had been priced too low.attractively/competitively priced The major mining stocks look attractively priced, and our recommendation is to buy.moderately/reasonably priced The sales staff always stay at a moderately priced hotel. →  See also bargain-priced , mid-priced , overpriced , underpriced
( also price sth up) to compare prices of similar products or services: We priced up the various systems on offer before deciding to go for this one.
( also price sth up) COMMERCE to put a ticket or label on goods in a store to show how much they cost: All these items need pricing up before they go on display. The gadget had been wrongly priced by the store, but they agreed to sell it to me for the price on the label.
price yourself/sb/sth out of the market COMMERCE to charge so much for a product or service that people cannot or do not want to buy it: By setting the price at that level we had effectively priced ourselves out of the market. With house prices and mortgage rates so high, first-time buyers are effectively priced out of the market.
(Definition of price verb from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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