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English definition of “prospect”

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prospect

noun
 
 
/ˈprɒspekt/
[C or U] the possibility that something might happen in the future, especially something good: there is little/no prospect of sth There is little prospect of the trade embargo being lifted this year. Is there any prospect that serious change in the administration's economic policies could emerge from this session?
prospects [plural] the possibility of being successful in the future: The market remains sceptical about the bank's prospects.prospects for sth Investors are becoming increasingly excited about prospects for the new drug. The growth prospects of the medical and health care equipment industry are promising.sb's career/job prospects Having a wide range of interests can improve your job prospects. business/economic/financial prospects
in prospect formal likely to happen in future: Another rise in interest rates is in prospect.
[S] the fact that something might or will happen in the future: The company faces the prospect of a new competitor entering the market with a better offer. These sanctions raise the prospect of a damaging Pacific trade war.
[C] MARKETING a possible future customer: Frequently, a salesperson has only a limited amount of time for contact with customers and prospects.
[C] HR a person who might be chosen as an employee: a prospect for sth We will interview four more prospects for the post this afternoon.
[C] someone or something that is likely to succeed in the future: This product was clearly a better prospect for advertisers.
(Definition of prospect noun from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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