push noun Meaning in Cambridge Business English Dictionary
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Meaning of "push" - Business English Dictionary

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push

noun
 
 
/pʊʃ/
[S] MARKETING an effort to make something more successful, for example by advertising it a lot or giving it extra money: The event is part of a major push by the hotel to attract customers.get a push This film is unlikely to attract large audiences unless it gets a big push in the media.give sth a push This is an economy that needs the Fed to step in and give it a push.
[C] a determined effort to get an advantage over other companies in business: make a push into sth The company plans to make a big push into the European market next spring.
give sb the push UK informal WORKPLACE, HR to tell someone that they no longer have a job, especially because they have done something wrong: I have no idea why they gave me the push.
get the push UK informal WORKPLACE, HR to be told that you no longer have a job, especially because you have done something wrong: Sounds like he hasn't come to terms with getting the push.
Translations of “push”
in Arabic دَفْعة…
in Korean 밀기, 누르기…
in Malaysian tenaga dan azam…
in French dynamisme…
in Turkish itiş kakış, itme, itekleme…
in Italian spinta…
in Chinese (Traditional) 推, 推,推動…
in Russian толчок, побуждение…
in Polish pchnięcie, popchnięcie, impuls…
in Vietnamese sự quyết tâm…
in Spanish empuje, dinamismo, ímpetu…
in Portuguese empurrão…
in Thai ความพยายาม…
in German der Schwung…
in Catalan empenta…
in Japanese 押すこと, 押し…
in Indonesian semangat…
in Chinese (Simplified) 推, 推,推动…
(Definition of push noun from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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