rent verb - definition in the Business English Dictionary - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

English definition of “rent”

See all translations

rent

verb
 
 
/rent/
[I or T] PROPERTY to pay a fixed amount of money regularly for the use of a room, house, office, etc.: Researchers said there was a growing divide between the home-owning majority and people who rent. Regardless of the boom in UK property prices, it is still cheaper to buy rather than rent a house.rent sth from sb She has been renting an apartment from a private landlord through a letting agent. A surprising number of storage units are rented by salesmen.
[T] ( also rent sth out) PROPERTY to receive an amount of money from somebody for the use of something, especially a room, house, office, etc. that you own: rent sth to sb She runs a commercial real estate company that rents office space to businesses.rent sth for sth She rents out one of her rooms to students. He renovated the three-storey building and rents it out as apartments. Each of these centres rents out farm machinery to local farmers at low cost.
[T] ( UK usually hire) COMMERCE to pay to use something for a short period of time: rent a car/an automobile I rented a car at Millennium Park and headed off to explore the island.
[I] US PROPERTY to be available for someone to use for a particular amount of money: rent at/for sth The rooms rented at a premium of $25 to $35 over regular rates.rent for sth Rooms that regularly rent for $59 a night suddenly cost $300 a night.
(Definition of rent verb from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of rent?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definitions of “rent” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day

kick off

the time when a game of football starts, or when it begins again after it has stopped because of a goal, etc.

Word of the Day

She’s got very good posture. (How we stand and sit)

by Liz Walter,
May 27, 2015
Recently on this blog, we looked at the words that we use to describe the way we move. This week we’re looking at words for describing our bodies when they are still, whether we are standing or sitting. Since most of us do far too much of this, let’s start with sitting.

Read More 

ancestral health noun

May 25, 2015
diet based on the presumed diet of our Palaeolithic ancestors ‘Ancestral health,’ to use a term popular among Paleo followers, has gone mass.

Read More