title Meaning in Cambridge Business English Dictionary
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Meaning of "title" - Business English Dictionary

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title

noun
 
 
/ˈtaɪtl/
[C] the name of a book, film, article, piece of music, etc.: The title of the film was "An Unreasonable Man".with/under a title The report is about to be published under the title Choosing Futures.
[C] a book with a particular title that is produced by a publisher: The publishing company has just 30 titles on its current list.
[C] a word that is sometimes used in front of someone's name to show their position: Use the pull-down menu to enter your title (Mr, Ms, Mrs, Dr, etc.).
[C] HR the name of a particular job in an organization: I have a new title: I'm Director of HR and Training.keep/give up/relinquish a title He gave up the title of CEO four years ago. I think his title is Chief of Staff. →  See also job title
[S] a position that a person or team gets by beating all the others in a sports competition: hold/win/defend a title The champion could not defend her title following knee surgery. the Premiership/World Series/Grand Slam title
[C or U] LAW, PROPERTY the legal right to own a building or a piece of land: have/hold (the) title He did not have title and therefore could not transfer the property to anyone else. Who holds the title to the property?
→  See also absolute title , abstract of title , bad title , deducing title , defective title , document of title , marketable title , proof of title , registered title , root of title , paper title , strata title
(Definition of title from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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