track noun Meaning in Cambridge Business English Dictionary
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Meaning of "track" - Business English Dictionary

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track

noun [C]
 
 
/træk/
the direction that something has taken or in which it is moving: They are able to forecast the track of the storm days in advance.
the way in which something develops or might develop: on the right/wrong track We believe we are on the right track to grow the business in the coming months.
the type of education or career someone chooses and the way it develops: She was a lawyer, but then she changed track completely and became a doctor. Students perform better once engaged in a career track with clear expectations of what it takes to get a job. a vocational/academic track
the way in which a thought or idea has developed or might develop: I found it difficult to follow the track of his argument.
keep track (of sth) to keep a record of something, or make certain that you know or remember what has happened: Keep track of the hours you work. His job is to keep track of all the shipments going out to customers.
lose track (of sth) to stop keeping a record of something, or stop being certain that you know or remember what has happened: I have lost track of the number of times you have been late this month. So many customers came in that I lost track after an hour.
on track making progress and likely to succeed or achieve a particular thing: They're on track to make record profits.
→  See also fast track , have the inside track
(Definition of track noun from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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