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Translation of "form" - English-Mandarin Chinese dictionary

form

verb     /fɔːm/ US  /fɔːrm/
[I or T] to begin to exist or to make something begin to exist (使)出现,(使)形成,(使)产生 A crowd formed around the accident. 事故现场围起了一群人。 A solution began to form in her mind. 她想到了一个解决办法。 She formed the clay into a small bowl. 她把陶土捏成了一只小碗。 I formed the impression (= the way she behaved suggested to me) that she didn't really want to come. 我形成了一种印象:她其实并不想来。 Creating and producingInventing, designing and innovation
[L only + noun] to make or be something 制作;成为 The lorries formed a barricade across the road. 数辆卡车横在路上,形成了路障。 Together they would form the next government. 他们将共同组建下届政府。 This information formed the basis of the report. 这些信息奠定了报告的基础。 Comprising and consisting ofIncluding and containing
[I] slightly formal ( also form up) If separate things form, they come together to make a whole 形成;组成 The children formed into lines. 孩子们排好了队。 The procession formed up and moved off slowly. 游行队伍列好队,缓缓离去。 Collecting and amassingForming groups (of people)
(Definition of form verb from the Cambridge English-Chinese (Simplified) Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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