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Chinese (Simplified) translation of “separate”

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separate

verb
 
 
/ˈsep.ər.eɪt/ US  /-ə.reɪt/
[I or T] to (cause to) divide into parts
(使)分离;(使)分开
The north and south of the country are separated by a mountain range.
这个国家的南北两部分被一条山脉隔开。
You can get a special device for separating egg whites from yolks.
你可以买一种把蛋白与蛋黄分开的专用器具。
The top and bottom sections are quite difficult to separate.
顶部和底部很难分开。
Separating and dividing
[I or T] to make people move apart or into different places, or to move apart
(使)分开;(使)分散
At school they always tried to separate Jane and me because we were troublemakers.
在学校里,他们总是设法把简和我分开,因为我们是捣蛋鬼。
Somehow, in the rush to get out of the building, I got separated from my mother.
急急忙忙冲出大楼的时候,不知怎么的,我和妈妈走散了。
Perhaps we should separate now and meet up later.
或许我们现在应该分开,晚些时候再见面。
Isolating and separating
[T] to consider two people or things as different or not related
分开考虑;认为(两者)不相关
You can't separate morality from politics.
你不能把道德与政治分开考虑。
Separating and dividing
[I] If a liquid separates it becomes two different liquids.
(液体)分离
Separating and dividing
[I] to start to live in a different place from your husband or wife because the relationship has ended
(夫妻)分居
My parents separated when I was six and divorced a couple of years later.
我6岁的时候父母分居,几年之后他们便离婚了。
Ending relationships and divorce
(Definition of separate verb from the Cambridge English-Chinese (Simplified) Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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