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Translation of "breath" - English-Traditional Chinese dictionary

breath

noun     /breθ/
[U] the air that goes into and out of your lungs 呼吸的空氣;氣息 Her breath smelled of garlic. 她的嘴裡有大蒜味。 She was dizzy and short of breath (= unable to breathe in enough air). 她頭昏眼花,上氣不接下氣。 He burst into the room, red-faced and out of breath (= unable to breathe comfortably because of tiredness or excitement). 他衝進房間,滿臉通紅,氣喘吁吁。 Breathing and stopping breathing
catch your breath ( UK also get your breath back)
to pause or rest for a short time until you can breathe comfortably or regularly again 停下來讓呼吸平緩下來 I had to stop running to catch my breath. 我跑得喘不上氣來,不得不停了下來。 Stop having or doing something
draw breath
to breathe 呼吸 Without pausing to draw breath she told me everything. 她氣也不喘一口就把一切告訴了我。 Breathing and stopping breathing
to pause for a short time to rest or recover 停下來喘口氣 Give me a moment to draw breath, won't you? 讓我歇一會喘口氣,行嗎? Stop having or doing something
hold your breath
to keep air in your lungs and not release it so that you need more 屏住呼吸 How long can you hold your breath under water? 你能屏住呼吸多長時間? Breathing and stopping breathing
[C] a single action of breathing air into your lungs 吸一下氣 Breathing and stopping breathing
take a breath
to breathe air into your lungs (as a single action) 吸氣 The doctor told me to take a deep breath (= breathe in a lot of air). 醫生讓我做深呼吸。 Breathing and stopping breathing
a breath of air
the smallest amount of wind 一絲微風 There wasn't a breath of air in the room. 房間裡悶得讓人透不過氣來。 Wind and windsStormy weather
a short period of time spent outside 在外面稍微呆一會兒;透氣 I'm just going out for a breath of (fresh) air - I won't be long. 我需要在外面呆一會兒,透透氣。 From, out and outside
(Definition of breath from the Cambridge English-Chinese (Traditional) Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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