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French translation of “cast”

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cast

verb /kaːst/ ( past tense past participle cast)
to throw
jeter
The angler cast his line into the river These facts cast new light on the matter She cast him a look of hatred.
to get rid of; to take off
se dépouiller de
Some snakes cast their skins.
to shape (metal etc) by pouring into a mould
couler
Metal is melted before it is cast.
to give a part in a play etc to
donner le rôle de
She was cast as Lady Macbeth.
to select the actors for (a film etc)
faire la distribution
The director is casting (the film) tomorrow.
to give (a vote) I cast my vote for the younger candidate. castaway noun a shipwrecked person.
naufragé/-ée
casting vote the deciding vote of the chairman of a meeting when the other votes are equally divided.
voix prépondérante
cast iron unpurified iron melted and shaped in a mould.
fonte
cast-iron adjective made of cast iron
en fonte
a cast-iron frying-pan.
very strong
d’acier
cast-iron muscles.
cast-off noun, adjective (a piece of clothing etc) no longer needed
vieilles fringues
cast-off clothes I don’t want my sister’s cast-offs.
cast off to untie (the mooring lines of a boat).
larguer (les amarres)
(also cast aside) to reject as unwanted.
(re)jeter
in knitting, to finish (the final row of stitches).
arrêter
cast on in knitting, to make the first row of stitches.
monter les mailles
(Definition of cast from the Password English-French Dictionary © 2014 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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