business translate English to German: Cambridge Dictionary
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Translation of "business" - English-German dictionary

business

noun /ˈbiznis/
occupation; buying and selling
das Geschäft
Selling china is my business The shop does more business at Christmas than at any other time.
a shop, a firm
das Geschäft
He owns his own business.
concern
die Angelegenheit
Make it your business to help him Let’s get down to business (= Let’s start the work etc that must be done).
businesslike adjective practical; alert and prompt
geschäftsmäßig
He adopted a businesslike approach to the problem She is very businesslike.
businessman noun ( feminine businesswoman) a person who makes a living from some form of trade or commerce, not from one of the professions.
der/die Geschäftsmann/-frau
on business in the process of doing business or something official.
geschäftlich
She often has to travel abroad on business.
(Definition of business from the Password English-German Dictionary © 2014 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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