nothing - Definition in the Cambridge English-Italian Dictionary - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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Italian translation of “nothing”

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nothing

pronoun
 
/ˈnʌθ·ɪŋ/
A2 not anything
niente
There was nothing in her suitcase. He said he did nothing wrong.
B1 not something important or valuable
niente
She was crying about nothing.
for nothing without a successful result
per niente
I came all this way for nothing.
have nothing to do with someone/something to not involve or affect someone or something
non aver niente a che fare con qualcuno/qualcosa
He made his own decision – I had nothing to do with it. I wish he wouldn’t give advice on my marriage – it has nothing to do with him (= he should not interfere).
there’s nothing for it used to emphasize you will have to do a particular thing to solve a problem
non c’è altro da fare
There’s nothing for it but to get some extra help.
there’s nothing to it used to say something is very easy
non ci vuole niente (a farlo), roba da niente, roba da ridere
Windsurfing is easy – there’s nothing to it.
Translations of “nothing”
in Arabic لا شَيء…
in Korean 아무것도, 사소한 것…
in Malaysian tiada apa…
in French rien…
in Turkish hiçbir şey, hiçbir, solda sıfır…
in Chinese (Traditional) 沒有東西, 沒有事情…
in Russian ничего, пустяк, мелочь…
in Polish nic…
in Vietnamese không có gì…
in Spanish nada…
in Portuguese nada…
in Thai ไม่มีอะไร…
in German nichts…
in Catalan res…
in Japanese 何も~ない, 何でもないこと…
in Indonesian tidak ada apa-apa…
in Chinese (Simplified) 没有东西, 没有事情…
(Definition of nothing from the Cambridge English-Italian Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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