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Italian translation of “place”

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place

noun
 
/pleɪs/
A1 a position, building, town, area, etc.
luogo, posto
His leg was broken in two places. Edinburgh would be a nice place to live. What a stupid place to park!
A2 informal someone’s home
casa
They just bought a place near the lake.
B1 your seat or position in a theatre, train, queue, etc.
posto
The children collected their prizes and then went back to their places. Do you want to trade places with me (= move so that you are in my place and I am in yours)?
B1 UK an opportunity to study at a college, to join a team, etc.
posto
She got a place at Oxford. He got a place in the team.
take place B1 to happen
aver luogo
The meeting will take place next week.
in first, second, etc. place B1 If you are in first, second, etc. place in a race or competition, that is your position when you finish.
al primo posto, al secondo posto, ecc.
He finished in fifth place.
all over the place in many different places
dappertutto
There was blood all over the place. I knocked over my mug and tea spilled all over the place.
take someone’s place to do something instead of someone else
prendere il posto di qualcuno
If I can’t go to the show tonight, will you take my place?
in the first place used to talk about whether something mentioned should have been done or not
in primo luogo
Why did you invite her in the first place?
in place of something instead of something
al posto di qualcosa
I use honey in place of sugar in my tea.
(Definition of place noun from the Cambridge English-Italian Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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