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Japanese translation of “leave”

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leave

verb
 
/liːv/ ( present participle leaving, past tense and past participle left)
A1 to go away from a place
(場所)を出る
I leave work at five o’clock. They left for Paris last night. She left school at 16.
A2 to not take something with you when you go away from a place
~を置いていく
I left my jacket in the car. She left a letter for me in the kitchen.
A2 to not use all of something
~を残す
They drank all the juice but they left some food.
A2 to put something in a place where it will stay
~を預ける
You can leave your bags at the station.
A2 to put something somewhere for another person to have later
~を(人に)取っておく
I left some sandwiches for them.
B1 to end a relationship with a husband, wife, or partner and stop living with him or her
(人)と縁を切る
I’ll never leave you. She left him for a younger man.
to give something to someone after you die
(人)に~を残して死ぬ
His aunt left him a lot of money. He left the house to Julia.
leave someone alone to stop speaking to someone
かまわないでおく
Leave me alone! I’m trying to work.
leave something open, on, off, etc. to make something stay open, on, off, etc.
(物)を開けた/つけた/消したままにしておく
Who left the window open?
(Definition of leave verb from the Cambridge English-Japanese Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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