stock noun translate English to Polish: Cambridge Dictionary

Translation of "stock" - English-Polish dictionary


SHOP [U] B2 all the goods that are available in a shop
zapas towaru, skład, towar, dostawa
We're expecting some new stock in this afternoon.Giving, providing and supplying
be in stock/out of stock B2 to be available/not available in a shop
być/nie być na stanie lub składzie
Available and accessiblePresentUnavailable and inaccessiblePresent
SUPPLY [C] a supply of something that is ready to be used
zasób, zapas
[usually plural] stocks of food/weaponsGiving, providing and supplying
COMPANY [C, U] the value of a company, or a share in its value
akcje, akcja
to buy/sell stock falling/rising stock prices Savings, interest and capital
LIQUID [U] a liquid made by boiling meat, bones, or vegetables and used to make soups, sauces, etc
wywar, bulion
chicken/vegetable stockSauces, dressings, dips and pickles
take stock (of sth) to think carefully about a situation before making a decision
dobrze się zastanowić (nad czymś )
→  See also laughing stock Thinking and contemplating
(Definition of stock noun from the Cambridge English-Polish Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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