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Russian translation of “cast”

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cast

verb [T]
 
 
/kɑːst/ ( past tense and past participle cast)
ACTOR B2 to choose an actor for a particular part in a film or play
давать или получать роль
[often passive] Why am I always cast as the villain?Casting, roles and scripts
THROW literary to throw something
бросать
Throwing
LIGHT literary to send light or shadow (= dark shapes) in a particular direction
отбрасывать
The moon cast a white light into the room.Emitting and ejecting
cast doubt/suspicion on sb/sth to make people feel less sure about or have less trust in someone or something
подвергать сомнению/подозревать кого-либо/что-либо
A leading scientist has cast doubts on government claims that the drug is safe.Upsetting and destabilizing
cast a/your vote to vote
голосовать
Elections
cast a spell on sb to seem to use magic to attract someone
околдовывать
The city had cast a spell on me and I never wanted to leave.Attracting and temptingAttractiveSexual attraction
to use magic to make something happen to someone
околдовывать
Magic
METAL to make an object by pouring hot metal into a container of a particular shape
отливать
→  See also cast/run your/an eye over sth , cast/shed light on sth , cast a pall over sth , cast a shadow over sth Industry and industrial processes
(Definition of cast verb from the Cambridge English-Russian Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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