translate translate English to Russian: Cambridge Dictionary
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Translation of "translate" - English-Russian dictionary

translate

verb [I, T]
 
 
/trænzˈleɪt/
LANGUAGE B1 to change written or spoken words from one language to another
переводить (с одного языка на другой)
The book has now been translated from Spanish into more than ten languages.Using other languages
CAUSE formal If an idea or plan translates into an action, it makes it happen.
воплощаться
So how does this theory translate into practical policy?Occurring and happening
Translations of “translate”
in Arabic يُتَرْجِم…
in Korean 번역하다…
in Malaysian menterjemah…
in French traduire…
in Turkish çevirmek, tercüme etmek, dönüşmek…
in Italian tradurre…
in Chinese (Traditional) 譯,翻譯, 轉化(尤指將計劃變為現實)…
in Polish tłumaczyć, przekładać, przekładać (się)…
in Vietnamese dịch…
in Spanish traducir…
in Portuguese traduzir…
in Thai แปล…
in German übersetzen…
in Catalan traduir…
in Japanese ~を翻訳する, 通訳する…
in Indonesian menerjemahkan…
in Chinese (Simplified) 译,翻译, 转化(尤指将计划变为现实)…
(Definition of translate from the Cambridge English-Russian Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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