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Translation of "accept" - English-Spanish dictionary

accept

verb   /əkˈsept/
B1 to take something that someone offers you aceptar He accepted the job. He won’t accept advice from anyone.
to say that something is true, often something bad admitir He refuses to accept that he made a mistake.
accept responsibility/blame
to admit that you caused something bad that happened asumir la responsabilidad/culpa I accept full responsibility for the accident.
(Definition of accept from the Cambridge English-Spanish Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

accept

verb /əkˈsept/
to take (something offered) aceptar She graciously accepted the gift.
to believe in, agree to or acknowledge aceptar We accept your account of what happened Their proposal was accepted He accepted responsibility for the accident.
to allow someone to join an organization, attend a university course etc Aceptar She got accepted to her top-choice college.
to make someone new feel welcome and part of a group Bienvenidos New residents are accepted gladly into the community.
to allow customers to pay for goods or services in a particular way Aceptar Do you accept credit cards?
acceptability noun
Aceptabilidad We are considering the acceptability of this approach to dealing with the problem.
acceptable adjective
(opposite unacceptable) satisfactory aceptable The decision should be acceptable to most people.
pleasing grato a very acceptable gift.
acceptably adverb
aceptablemente, adecuadamente Trade winds keep the temperature to an acceptably comfortable level.
acceptance noun
aceptación the acceptance of a job offer.
accepted adjective
generally recognized reconocido It is an accepted fact that the world is round.
(Definition of accept from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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