baby translate English to Spanish: Cambridge Dictionary
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Translation of "baby" - English-Spanish dictionary

baby

noun /ˈbeibi/ ( plural babies)
a very young child
bebé
Some babies cry during the night (also adjective) a baby boy.
a very young animal
Crías
The rabbit is feeding its babies.
babyish adjective like a baby or suitable for a baby; not mature
infantil, pegado a las faldas de su madre
a babyish child who cries every day at school Do you think this book is too babyish for a nine-year-old?
baby buggy noun ( baby carriage) (American) a pram
cochecito de niño
baby grand noun (music) a small grand piano.
piano de media cola
babysit verb ( past tense, past participle babysat) to remain in a house to look after a child while its parents are out
cuidar niños, hacer de canguro, hacer de niñera
She babysits for her aunt every Saturday.
babysitter noun
niñera, canguro
I often acted as babysitter for my younger sister.
babysitting noun
cuidado de niños
She earns pocket money by doing babysitting for the neighbours/neighbors.
(Definition of baby from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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