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Spanish translation of “bar”

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bar

noun /baː/
a rod or oblong piece (especially of a solid substance)
barra; tableta; barrote, reja
a gold bar a bar of chocolate There were iron bars on the windows.
a broad line or band
barra, franja
a piece of blue material with bars of red running through it.
a bolt
tranca
There was a bar on the door.
a counter at which or across which articles of a particular kind are sold
barra, mostrador
a snack bar Your whisky is on the bar.
a place where alcoholic drinks are served.
bar
a cocktail/wine bar.
a measured division in music
compás
They sang the first ten bars of the song.
something which prevents (something)
impedimento, obstáculo
His carelessness could prove to be a bar to his promotion.
the rail at which the prisoner stands in court
banquillo
The prisoner at the bar collapsed when he was sentenced to ten years’ imprisonment.
bar chart /ˈbaː ˌɡraːf/ noun ( bar graph) (mathematics) a diagram that uses bars of different heights to represent different amounts
Diagrama de Barras
The bar graph shows the numbers of visitors to the UK in each of the past 12 months.
barmaid /ˈbaː ˌmeid/ /ˈbaːmən/ /ˈbaːˌtendə/ noun ( barman, bartender) a person who serves at the bar of a pub or hotel
camarero; camarera
She works as a barmaid at the De Freville Arms pub.
bar code noun a code in the form of parallel lines printed on goods from which the computer reads information about their price etc
código de barras
The checkout assistant has to swipe the barcode of each product.
(Definition of bar from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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