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Spanish translation of “bring”

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bring

verb /briŋ/ ( past tense, past participle brought /broːt/)
to make (something or someone) come (to or towards a place)
traer, llevar
I’ll bring plenty of food with me Bring him to me!
to result in
proporcionar, provocar, dar, causar
This medicine will bring you relief.
bring about phrasal verb to cause
provocar, causar, ocasionar
His disregard for danger brought about his death.
bring back phrasal verb to (cause to) return
devolver; traer (a la memoria), recordar
She brought back the umbrella she had borrowed Her singing brings back memories of my mother.
bring down phrasal verb to cause to fall
derribar, tirar abajo
The storm brought several trees down.
bring home to to prove or show (something) clearly to (someone)
hacer ver, abrir los ojos, mostrar con claridad
His illness brought home to her how much she depended on him.
bring off phrasal verb to achieve (something attempted)
lograr, conseguir, obtener
They brought off an unexpected victory.
bring round phrasal verb to bring back from unconsciousness
reanimar, hacer volver en sí
The fresh air brought him round after he had fainted.
bring up phrasal verb to rear or educate
educar
Her parents brought her up to be polite.
to introduce (a matter) for discussion
sacar a colación, sacar a relucir, presentar
Bring the matter up at the next meeting.
bring towards the speaker: Mary, bring me some coffee. take away from the speaker: Take these cups away. fetch from somewhere else and bring to the speaker: Fetch me my book from the bedroom.
(Definition of bring from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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