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Translation of "correspond" - English-Spanish dictionary

correspond

verb   /ˌkɒr·ɪˈspɒnd/
to be the same or very similar corresponder The newspaper story does not correspond with/to what really happened.
to communicate with someone by writing letters escribirse They had corresponded ever since the war.
(Definition of correspond from the Cambridge English-Spanish Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

correspond

verb /korəˈspond/
(with to) to be similar; to match corresponder a, equivaler a A bird’s wing corresponds to the arm and hand in humans.
(with with) to be in agreement with; to match concordar, ir bien con These results correspond with those of earlier experiments.
to communicate by letter (with) mantener correspondencia con, cartearse con Do they often correspond (with each other)?
correspondence noun
agreement; similarity or likeness correspondencia a close correspondence between the two sets of test results.
(communication by) letters correspondencia I must deal with that (big pile of) correspondence.
correspondent noun
a person with whom one exchanges letters correspondiente He has correspondents all over the world.
a person who contributes news to a newspaper etc corresponsal He’s foreign correspondent for ’The Times’.
corresponding adjective
similar, matching correspondiente The rainfall this month is not as high as for the corresponding month last year.
correspondence course noun
a course of lessons by post curso por correspondencia/a distancia a correspondence course in accountancy.
(Definition of correspond from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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