cramp translate English to Spanish: Cambridge Dictionary
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Translation of "cramp" - English-Spanish dictionary

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cramp

noun /krӕmp/
(medical) (a) painful stiffening of the muscles
calambre, rampa
The swimmer got cramp and drowned.
cramped adjective (of a room or building) not having enough space for the people in it
Estrecho
The prisoners were held in very cramped conditions.
feeling uncomfortable because there is not enough space
Apretado
It felt cramped inside the tiny car.
(of writing) with letters that are close together and difficult to read
Estrecho
It was difficult to decipher her cramped handwriting.
Translations of “cramp”
in Arabic تَشنّج…
in Korean 경련…
in Malaysian kejang otot…
in French crampe…
in Turkish kramp…
in Italian crampo…
in Chinese (Traditional) 痙攣,抽筋(常出現在大量運動後)…
in Russian спазм…
in Polish skurcz…
in Vietnamese chuột rút…
in Portuguese cãibra…
in Thai ตะคริว…
in German der Krampf…
in Catalan rampa…
in Japanese こむらがえり, けいれん…
in Indonesian kejang…
in Chinese (Simplified) 痉挛,抽筋(常出现在大量运动后)…
(Definition of cramp from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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