dead translate English to Spanish: Cambridge Dictionary
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Translation of "dead" - English-Spanish dictionary

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dead

adjective /ded/
without life; not living
muerto
a dead body Throw out those dead flowers.
not working and not giving any sign of being about to work
desconectado, cortado
The phone/engine is dead.
absolute or complete
total, completo
There was dead silence at his words He came to a dead stop.
deaden verb to lessen, weaken or make less sharp, strong etc
amortiguar
The nurse gave him an injection to deaden the pain.
deadly adjective ( comparative deadlier, superlative deadliest) causing death a deadly poison. very great
absolutamente
He is in deadly earnest (= He is completely serious).
very dull or uninteresting
aburridísimo
What a deadly job this is.
dead end noun a road closed off at one end.
callejón sin salida
dead-end adjective leading nowhere
sin salida
a dead-end job.
dead heat noun a race, or a situation happening in a race, in which two or more competitors cross the finishing line together
empate
The race ended in a dead heat.
dead language noun a language no longer spoken, eg Latin.
lengua muerta
deadline noun a time by which something must be done or finished
fecha límite
Monday is the deadline for handing in this essay.
deadlock noun a situation in which no further progress towards an agreement is possible
punto muerto, impasse
Talks between the two sides ended in deadlock.
to set a deadline (not dateline) for finishing a job.
(Definition of dead from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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