domestic - translate into Spanish with the English-Spanish dictionary - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Spanish translation of “domestic”

See all translations

domestic

adjective /dəˈmestik/
of or in the house or home
doméstico
a domestic servant domestic utensils.
concerning one’s private life or family
doméstico, familiar
domestic problems.
(of animals) tame and living with or used by people
doméstico
Cats are popular domestic pets.
not foreign
nacional
a domestic airline the Government’s domestic policy.
domesticate /-keit/ verb to train animals to become accustomed to living near and being used by people
Domesticar
How long does it take to domesticate a cat?
to cultivate plants or crops so that they can be used by humans.
Cultivar
to train someone to be good at doing jobs associated with running a house
Domésticar
domesticated /-keitid/ adjective (of animals) accustomed to living near and being used by people
domesticado
(of plants) cultivated for use by people
Cultivado
domesticated plants such as tomatoes.
good at doing jobs associated with running a house
casero, doméstico
My husband has become very domesticated since I’ve been ill.
domestication noun
domesticación
the domestication of plants and animals for food production.
domesticity /doumeˈstisəti/ noun (fondness for) home life
vida casera
After so many years travelling, he had a longing for domesticity.
domestic help noun (a person paid to give) assistance with housework etc.
servicio doméstico
(Definition of domestic from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

More translations of “domestic” in Spanish

Definitions of “domestic” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day

force

physical, especially violent, strength, or power

Word of the Day

They sometimes go here and they never go there: using adverbs of frequency

by Liz Walter,
April 29, 2015
Sometimes, always, often, never: these are some of the most common words in English.  Unfortunately, they are also some of the words that cause the most problems for students. Many of my students put them in the wrong place, often because that’s where they go in their own languages. They say things

Read More 

Evel abbreviation

May 04, 2015
English votes for English laws; the idea that only English (as opposed to Scottish, Welsh or Irish) MPs should be allowed to vote for laws that affect only England Yet these are the two principal constitutional proposals that have come from the Conservative party in its kneejerk response to Ukip’s English nationalism and

Read More