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Translation of "element" - English-Spanish dictionary

element

noun   /ˈel·ɪ·mənt/
a part of something elemento This book has all the elements of a good story.
an element of something
a small amount of something un grado de algo There’s an element of truth in what she says.
a simple substance that you cannot reduce to smaller chemical parts elemento Iron is a common element.
be in your element
to be happy because you are doing what you like doing and what you are good at estar uno en su salsa I’m in my element at a children’s party.
(Definition of element from the Cambridge English-Spanish Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

element

noun /ˈeləmənt/
an essential part of anything elemento Sound teaching of mathematics is one of the elements of a good education.
(chemistry) a substance that cannot be split by chemical means into simpler substances elemento Hydrogen, chlorine, iron, and uranium are elements.
surroundings necessary for life medio Water is a fish’s natural element.
a slight amount parte, algo There is an element of doubt in my mind.
the heating part in an electric kettle etc. resistencia
elementary /-ˈmen-/ adjective
very simple; not advanced elemental, básico elementary mathematics.
elements noun plural
the first things to be learned in any subject rudimentos the elements of musical theory.
the forces of nature, as wind and rain elementos The hut provided protection from the elements.
in one’s element
in the surroundings that are most natural or pleasing to one estar en su elemento, estar muy a gusto The actor is clearly in his element paying this role.
(Definition of element from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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