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Translation of "from" - English-Spanish dictionary

from

preposition   strong /frɒm/ weak /frəm/
A1 used to show the place where someone or something started desde Did you walk all the way from the beach? I’m flying from Chicago to Boston tomorrow.
A1 used to show the time when something starts or the time when it was made or first existed de, desde The museum is open from 9.30 to 6.00.
A1 used to say where someone was born, or where someone lives or works de Steve’s father is from Poland.
A1 used to say how far away something is de The house is about five miles from the city.
A1 used to say who gave or sent something to someone de Who are your flowers from?
A2 used to say what something is made of (a partir) de juice made from oranges
If you take something from a person, place, or amount, you take it away. de, a He took a knife from the drawer.
used to say what causes something por Deaths from heart disease continue to rise every year. He suffers from asthma.
used to show a change in the state of someone or something de Things went from bad to worse.
(Definition of from from the Cambridge English-Spanish Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

from

preposition /from/
used before the place, thing, person, time etc that is the point at which an action, journey, period of time etc begins de from Europe to Asia from Monday to Friday a letter from her father.
used to indicate that from which something or someone comes de a quotation from Shakespeare.
used to indicate separation de Take it from him.
used to indicate a cause or reason de He is suffering from a cold.
(Definition of from from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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cn u txt?
cn u txt?
by ,
June 28, 2016
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