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Translation of "inquire" - English-Spanish dictionary

inquire

verb ( present participle inquiring, past tense and past participle inquired) formal ( UK also enquire)   /ɪnˈkwaɪər/
to ask someone for information about something hacer una consulta, preguntar I am inquiring about French classes in the area.
(Definition of inquire from the Cambridge English-Spanish Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

inquire

verb /inˈkwaiə/
to ask preguntar He inquired the way to the art gallery She inquired what time the bus left.
(with about) to ask for information about pedir información They inquired about trains to London.
(with after) to ask for information about the state of (eg a person’s health) preguntar por He enquired after her mother.
(with for) to ask to see or talk to (a person) preguntar por Someone rang up inquiring for you, but you were out.
(with for) to ask for (goods in a shop etc) preguntar, pedir Several people have been inquiring for the new catalogue.
(with into) to try to discover the facts of investigar, indagar, tratar de averiguar The police are inquiring into the matter.
inquiry /American also ˈinkwəri/ noun ( plural inquiries, plural enquiries) ( enquiry /American also ˈenkwəri/)
(an act of) asking or investigating investigaciones, indagaciones His inquiries led him to her hotel (also adjective) All questions will be dealt with at the inquiry desk.
an investigation investigación, pesquisa An inquiry is being held into her disappearance.
make inquiries
to ask for information pedir información, investigar The police are making inquiries into the break-in at the post office.
(Definition of inquire from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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