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Translation of "luck" - English-Spanish dictionary

luck

noun [no plural]   /lʌk/
A2 good and bad things caused by chance and not by your own actions casualidad It was just luck that we got on the same train.
success suerte He’s been trying to find work but with no luck so far.
good luck!
something you say to someone when you hope they will do well ¡suerte! Good luck with your exam!
be down on your luck
to be experiencing a bad situation or to have very little money estar pasando una mala racha He’s been a bit down on his luck recently.
(Definition of luck from the Cambridge English-Spanish Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

luck

noun /lak/
the state of happening by chance suerte Whether you win or not is just luck – there’s no skill involved.
something good which happens by chance suerte She has all the luck!
luckless adjective
unfortunate desafortunado a luckless victim.
lucky adjective ( comparative luckier, superlative luckiest)
having good luck afortunado He was very lucky to escape alive.
bringing good luck de la suerte a lucky number a lucky charm.
luckily adverb
afortunadamente Luckily, we were just in time to catch the last bus.
luckiness noun
suerte
lucky dip noun
(British ) a form of amusement at a fair etc in which prizes are drawn from a container without the taker seeing what he is getting; grab bag(American) caja de sorpresas
bad luck!
an expression of sympathy for someone who has failed or been unlucky. ¡otra vez será!
good luck!
an expression of encouragement made to someone who is about to take part in a competition, sit an exam etc ¡buena suerte! Good luck with your job interview! She wished him good luck.
worse luck!
most unfortunately! ¡desgraciadamente! He’s allowing me to go, but he’s coming too, worse luck!
(Definition of luck from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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