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Translation of "miss" - English-Spanish dictionary

miss

verb /mis/
to fail to hit, catch etc fallar, errar The arrow missed the target.
to fail to arrive in time for perder He missed the 8 o’clock train.
to fail to take advantage of perder You’ve missed your opportunity.
to feel sad because of the absence of lamentar, sentir You’ll miss your friends when you go to live abroad.
to notice the absence of echar de menos, añorar I didn’t miss my purse till several hours after I’d dropped it.
to fail to hear or see perderse He missed what you said because he wasn’t listening.
to fail to go to no asistir, faltar I’ll have to miss my lesson next week, as I’m going to the dentist.
to fail to meet perder We missed you in the crowd.
to avoid evitar The thief only just missed being caught by the police.
(of an engine) to misfire. fallar
missing adjective
not in the usual place or not able to be found perdido, extraviado, desaparecido The child has been missing since Tuesday I’ve found those missing papers.
go missing
to be lost desaparecer A group of climbers has gone missing in the Himalayas.
miss out phrasal verb
to omit or fail to include saltarse, omitir I missed her out (of the list) because she was away on holiday.
(often with on) to be left out of something perderse algo George missed out (on all the fun) because of his broken leg.
miss the boat
to be left behind, miss an opportunity etc perder el tren, perder la ocasión I meant to send her a birthday card, but I missed the boat – her birthday was last week.
(Definition of miss from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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