shake translate English to Spanish: Cambridge Dictionary
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Translation of "shake" - English-Spanish dictionary

shake

verb /ʃeik/ ( past tense shook /ʃuk/, past participle shaken)
to (cause to) tremble or move with jerks
agitar, (hacer) temblar
The explosion shook the building We were shaking with laughter Her voice shook as she told me the sad news.
to shock, disturb or weaken
debilitar
He was shaken by the accident My confidence in him has been shaken.
shaking noun an act of shaking or state of being shaken, shocked etc
sacudida
They got a shaking in the crash.
shaky adjective ( comparative shakier, superlative shakiest) weak or trembling with age, illness etc
tembloroso
a shaky voice shaky handwriting.
unsteady or likely to collapse
cojo, inestable
a shaky chair.
(sometimes with at) not very good, accurate etc
flojo
He’s a bit shaky at arithmetic My arithmetic has always been very shaky I’d be grateful if you would correct my rather shaky spelling.
shakily adverb
con voz trémula
She walked shakily down the hall.
shakiness noun
inestabilidad
shake-up noun a disturbance or reorganization
reorganización
The whole management could do with a good shake-up.
no great shakes not very good or important
no ser gran cosa
He has written a book, but it’s no great shakes.
shake one’s fist at to hold up one’s fist as though threatening to punch
amenazar a alguien con el puño
He shook his fist at me when I drove into the back of his car.
shake one’s head to move one’s head round to left and right to mean ’No’
negar con la cabeza, decir que no con la cabeza
’Are you coming?’ I asked. She shook her head.
shake off phrasal verb to rid oneself of
librarse de
He soon shook off the illness.
shake up phrasal verb to disturb or rouse (people) so as to make them more energetic
sacudir
The new manager has promised to really shake things up.
(Definition of shake from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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